Snowdome co-founder, Professor Miles Prince publishes a paper on impressive new research

Snowdome co-founder, Professor Miles Prince publishes a paper on impressive new research

Snowdome co-founder, Professor Miles Prince publishes a paper on impressive new research

The Snowdome Foundation is proud to announce that blood cancer specialist, researcher and co-founder of Snowdome, Professor Miles Prince, has published a paper in The Lancet reporting on the outcome of the ALCANZA study, an international, randomised, open-label Phase 3 trial of brentuximab vedotin versus physician’s choice in previously treated patients with skin lymphoma.

The ALCANZA study which included 131 adults, is the largest reported phase 3 trial in skin lymphoma. One of the adults involved in this trial was Patrick Devine, a patient of Professor Prince. Patrick believes being on a clinical trial for brentuximab has given him a real chance of greatly improving his life.

As a phase 3 trial involves a comparison to an established treatment, Patrick was initially assigned to the comparison drug, bexarotene. He has expressed this part of the trial was more difficult and when his response was poor, he was very thankful to change over to the brentuximab arm.

Patrick and the other adults that were on the trial had brentuximab vedotin were administered the drug intravenously every 3 weeks for up to 48 weeks (16 cycles). Whilst Patrick still suffers peripheral neuropathy, which initially started when he was on the course of bexarotene, he has had noticeable improvement since being on brentuximab and more frequently manages to take part in his usual physical activities. Patrick’s philosophy is to make the best of life in what ever circumstances he finds himself. “I love my life”, he says, “speed humps and all. I am not just fighting cancer but living life to the best of my capability and giving it the best chance.”

The Lancet reports that the ALCANZA study represents a major milestone in the development of more effective systemic therapies skin lymphoma, bringing to the forefront a much needed new therapeutic option for patients with relapsed skin lymphoma. It also states that it is not unthinkable that one of these combinations will produce a major shift in the natural history of the disease.

Professor Prince’s dedication and commitment to the ALCANZA study and his endless pursuit to further treatment options, gives real hope and encouragement for patients with blood cancers.

http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2017/06/07/major-advance-treating-rare-cancer

http://www.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/lancet/PIIS0140-6736(17)31266-7.pdf