Snowdome supports epigenetic BET inhibitors clinical trial

Snowdome supports epigenetic BET inhibitors clinical trial

As today is International Clinical Trials Day (commemorating 20 May 1747, the day on which James Lind started his famous trial comparing treatments for scurvy), Snowdome is proud to share the following links to articles that appeared in the media today.

The trial in the spotlight of all articles is supported by Snowdome funding. Consultant haematologists and clinical trial leaders Associate Professor Mark Dawson * and Dr Michael Dickinson ** (pictured, with Mark Dawson on the right) are at the forefront of epigenetics research and the effective ways that epigenetic therapy can treat aggressive blood cancers.

Peter Mac website – http://www.petermac.org/news/opening-new-frontier-first-class-%E2%80%98epigenetic%E2%80%99-drug-clinical-trials-people-advanced-blood-cancer

The Age – http://www.theage.com.au/technology/sci-tech/blood-cancer-carolines-trial-first-could-lead-the-way-for-others-20150519-gh4v1r.html

The Herald Sun – http://www.petermac.org/sites/default/files/About_us/News_media/Blood%20cancer%20hope-%20Landmark%20discovery%20leads%20to%20human%20trials_Herald%20Sun%20pg%209_200515.pdf

ABC News – http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-05-20/first-human-trials-of-new-blood-cancer-drug-at-peter-mac/6483604

To quote Mark Dawson – “Our driving objective as cancer clinicians and cancer researchers is to bring the latest and greatest in cancer medicine to our doorstep. The advantage of trials such as this is that it offers new hope.”

 

* The Snowdome Foundation in conjunction with the George and Yolanda Klempfner Fellowship support the Cancer Epigenetics Laboratory led by A/Prof. Mark Dawson. The Cancer Epigenetics Laboratory researchers are studying the role of epigenetic regulators in normal and malignant haematopoiesis. These insights are then used to identify novel therapies for the treatment of blood cancers.

** Dr. Michael Dickinson is a Haematologist at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and worked as the epigenetics Snowdome Fellow from 2010 to 2013. He has recently been appointed as the Julie Borschmann Fellow in multiple myeloma at the University of Melbourne and Peter Mac, where he will be continuing his research into blood cancers and epigenetics.